Buntsandstein (Early Triassic)

At the end of the Palaeozoic, the surface of the Earth changed considerably. Tectonic processes moved large parts of present-day Europe into subtropical latitudes. Simultaneously, intensive volcanism dramatically increased carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. A natural greenhouse effect was the result. Both tectonics and climate change caused the extinction of many plants and animals. During the Early Triassic, the first period of the Mesozoic Era, many “new” species of plants and animals appeared. The landscape of Southwestern Germany became increasingly flat. During this time, heavy rains formed temporary lakes, inhabited by only a few animal species. Remains of this fauna are rarely preserved in clay lenses. At the end of the Early Triassic, these lakes disappeared as Southwestern Germany was flooded by the Middle Triassic Sea.

Arizonasaurus

Chirotherium

Eocyclotosaurus

Koiloskiosaurus

Lagosuchus

Pleuromeia

Sclerosaurus armatus

Tanystropheus