M.Sc. Maura Renninger

Doctoral candidate

Hymenoptera

Contact

Tel.:
0711 / 8936-228
Fax:
0711 / 8936-100

Research profile

My research focuses on parasitoid Hymenoptera in the context of insect decline and ecosystem services. Parasitoid wasps develop on or inside a host, serve as natural biological control agents and therefore fulfill an essential ecosystem function. However, this insect group is under the radar of recent insect monitoring projects. The aim of my PhD project is to assess the phenology of parasitoids in the current monitoring project in order to create a baseline for future work. My interest lies in the ecology and occurrence of parasitoids in different landscapes.

Publications

2021

  • Dieckhoff, C., Wenz, S., Renninger, M., Reißig, A., Rauleder, H., Zebitz, C. P., ... & Zimmermann, O.  (2021). Add Germany to the List—Adventive Population of Trissolcus japonicus Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) Emerges in Germany. Insects 12(5): 414.

2020

Education

2020-present

  • Doctoral candidate at the State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart, Department of Entomology in cooperation with the University of Hohenheim, Institute of Biology, Zoology Department. Dissertation title: Ecosystem services and insect decline: The role of parasitoid Hymenoptera

2017-2020

  • Master of Science in Biology at University of Hohenheim; Major subject: Animal Ecology; Master’s thesis: Energetic limitations and torpor use in garden dormice and edible dormice

2016-2020

  • Temporary job in the Insect Diagnostic Laboratory at the Agricultural Research Centre (LTZ) Augustenberg, Karlsruhe

2014-2017

  • Bachelor of Science in Biology at University of Hohenheim; Major subject: Animal Ecology; Bachelor’s thesis: Effects of season and altitude on small mammal communities in the Black Forest National Park

Scholarships

  • Doctoral scholarship within Landesgraduiertenförderungsgesetz (LGFG) Baden-Württemberg since November 2020

Research stays

  • Research semester with laboratory and field work on the topic thermoregulation and ecology of small mammals at University of New England, Armidale, Australia